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Shocking drunk driving statistics compiled by MADD

Drunk driving has been a popular topic in recent years. Generally, there has been greater attention paid to drunk drivers’ across all levels of government. This has led to an increase in studies conducted in search of answers. These studies seek answers about why drunk driving occurs and who it affects after it happens.

MADD, or Mothers against Drunk Driving, is an organization founded in 1980 that aims at eliminating drunk driver induced deaths. It was founded by mothers who were affected by drunk drivers, but is now open to anyone interested in preventing drunk driving. They even offer a 24 hour victim/survivor hotline dedicated to helping those affected by drunk driving.

Because MADD is well established, they are well versed in some lesser known drunk driving statistics. For instance, on average, a person arrested on drunk driving charges has driven drunk 80 times before the person’s arrest. On the upside, the number of drunk driving related deaths has been cut in half since MADD was founded. In 2011, it was discovered that it was 4.5 times more likely to be involved in a drunk driving accident at night than during the daytime. Financially, drunk driving costs each American roughly $800 per year.

As you can see, drunk driving does not solely affect the person and family directly involved in an accident. Drunk driving has a broader reach and it affects all of us in one way or another. A person convicted of drunk driving often legal consequences related to the accident. If a driver is found negligent for a car accident caused by drunk driving there could be serious implications including reparations, jail time and a civil suit.

Source: madd.org, “Drunk Driving Statistics,” Accessed Jan. 19, 2015

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