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What are the most dangerous areas for motorcyclists?

The roads out west can be unpredictable, especially with so many wide, open stretches and scenic views that can distract. The risks vary based on the type of vehicle being driven—for example, truckers often face fewer risks because of the size and weight of their vehicle. On the other hand, because of the smaller size and weight of a motorcycle, their riders face a higher risk.

Any roadway may pose a danger, but motorcyclists benefit from staying even more vigilant in certain driving situations and places on the road.

Dangerous predicaments on the road

MotorBiscuit discusses some of the biggest risks for motorcyclists on the road. Among them, other drivers feature over and over again. Other drivers make certain areas of the road more dangerous for motorcyclists.

Intersections and turns both pose elevated risk for motorcycle crashes. Intersections are often dangerous for anyone, because there is always the risk of a driver not waiting for their turn and hitting a car with the right of way. Unfortunately, this risk is even higher with motorcycles. Many drivers have trouble spotting motorcycles, since they are smaller than the average vehicle. This leads to cars turning too soon, or venturing into an intersection that they mistakenly think is clear.

Low visibility impacts motorcycles

Areas of the road with low visibility have higher risks for similar reasons. This includes roads with heavy overgrown trees or shrubs lining it. It can even include clear roads on foggy days when visibility is low.

It’s important for all drivers to stay on guard any time they get behind the wheel. Motorcyclists in particular should be aware of the more dangerous scenarios that may present themselves in a world where vehicles still dominate the roads.

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